Con la profesora Ferradáns los estudiantes de la clase “Span 308, Introducción a la literatura,” hacen una lectura dramática de “La casa de Bernarda Alba” de Federico García Lorca.



Emmy Grace está viviendo en Guatemala donde trabaja con cooperativas de café y artesanos locales con la companía, De la Gente. Uno de los programas es el turismo comunitario y Emmy es la directora de “community engagement”. Entre otras responsabilidades recibe grupos que vienen por 1-2 semanas para viajes de “alternative breaks” y “service learning”.

Nos mandó unas fotos preciosas con el siguiente mensaje:
“Fui a un lugar que se llama Semuc Champey el mes pasado. Es un lugar muy bonito con piscinas naturales. Para el día de Todos los santos fui a un festival con cometas gigantes! Y en septiembre el pueblo donde está la oficina donde trabajo tiene una celebración en la comunidad. Y por último, una vista desde el techo de la oficina.”





Este año el club español organizó una exposición en la biblioteca Ames con la ayuda de las bibliotecatiras Crystal Boyce y Meg Miner. ¡Crearon unas calaveras de azúcar maravillosas!


1 las calaveras

2. detalle de la vitrina

3. razones

4. las ceras

En una entrevista con Marilynne Robinson, “President Obama & Marilynne Robinson: A Conversation—II,” el presidente Obama habla de lo que aprendimos de la literatura y por qué es tan importante leer. También ofrece su perspectiva sobre la nueva sensación de Broadway, “Hamilton” de Lin-Manuel Miranda.
Para leer toda la entrevista, sigue este enlace:

The President: Are you somebody who worries about people not reading novels anymore? And do you think that has an impact on the culture? When I think about how I understand my role as citizen, setting aside being president, and the most important set of understandings that I bring to that position of citizen, the most important stuff I’ve learned I think I’ve learned from novels. It has to do with empathy. It has to do with being comfortable with the notion that the world is complicated and full of grays, but there’s still truth there to be found, and that you have to strive for that and work for that. And the notion that it’s possible to connect with some[one] else even though they’re very different from you.

And so I wonder when you’re sitting there writing longhand in some—your messy longhand somewhere—so I wonder whether you feel as if that same shared culture is as prevalent and as important in the lives of people as it was, say, when you were that little girl in Idaho, coming up, or whether you feel as if those voices have been overwhelmed by flashier ways to pass the time.

Marilynne Robinson: I’m not really the person—because I’m almost always talking with people who love books.

The President: Right. You sort of have a self-selecting crew.

Robinson: And also teaching writers—I’m quite aware of the publication of new writers. I think—I mean, the literature at present is full to bursting. No book can sell in that way that Gone with the Wind sold, or something like that. But the thing that’s wonderful about it is that there’s an incredible variety of voices in contemporary writing. You know people say, is there an American tradition surviving in literature, and yes, our tradition is the incredible variety of voices….

And [now] you don’t get the conversation that would support the literary life. I think that’s one of the things that has made book clubs so popular.


Robinson: I think that in our earlier history—the Gettysburg Address or something—there was the conscious sense that democracy was an achievement. It was not simply the most efficient modern system or something. It was something that people collectively made and they understood that they held it together by valuing it. I think that in earlier periods—which is not to say one we will never return to—the president himself was this sort of symbolic achievement of democracy. And there was the human respect that I was talking about before, [that] compounds itself in the respect for the personified achievement of a democratic culture. Which is a hard thing—not many people can pull that together, you know…. So I do think that one of the things that we have to realize and talk about is that we cannot take it for granted. It’s a made thing that we make continuously.

The President: A source of optimism—I took my girls to see Hamilton, this new musical on Broadway, which you should see. Because this wonderful young Latino playwright produced this play, musical, about Alexander Hamilton and the Founding Fathers. And it’s all in rap and hip-hop. And it’s all played by young African-American and Latino actors.

And it sounds initially like it would not work at all. And it is brilliant, and so much so that I’m pretty sure this is the only thing that Dick Cheney and I have agreed on—during my entire political career—it speaks to this vibrancy of American democracy, but also the fact that it was made by these living, breathing, flawed individuals who were brilliant. We haven’t seen a collection of that much smarts and chutzpah and character in any other nation in history, I think.

But what’s most important about [Hamilton] and why I think it has received so many accolades is it makes it live. It doesn’t feel distant. And it doesn’t feel set apart from the arguments that we’re having today.

And Michelle and I, when we went to see it, the first thing we thought about was what could we do to encourage this kind of creativity in teaching history to our kids. Because, look, America is famously ahistorical. That’s one of our strengths—we forget things. You go to other countries, they’re still having arguments from four hundred years ago, and with serious consequences, right? They’re bloody arguments. In the Middle East right now, you’ve got arguments dating back to the seventh century that are live today. And we tend to forget that stuff. We don’t sometimes even remember what happened two weeks ago.

But this point you made about us caring enough about the blood, sweat, and tears involved in maintaining a democracy is vital and important. But it also is the reason why I think those who have much more of an “us” versus “them,” fearful, conspiratorial brand of politics can thrive sometimes is because they can ignore that history.

If, in fact, you don’t know much about the evolution of slavery and the civil rights movement and the Civil War and the postwar amendments, then the arguments that are being had now about how our criminal justice system interacts with African-Americans seem pretty foreign. It’s like, what are the issues here? If you’re not paying attention to how Jefferson and Madison and Franklin and others were thinking about the separation of church and state, then you’re not that worried about keeping those lines separate.

Este otoño para la reunión del consejo ejecutivo de la Cervantes Society of America, la profa. Nadeau recreó un banquete suntuoso con platos del recetario de Francisco Martínez Montiño, Arte de cocina, pasterliería, vizcochería, y conservería (1611).
CSa menu for blog

Empanadas de conejo con salsa negra y berenjenas rellenas
(foto por cortesía de R. Hernández)
RH la mesa primeros

Ensalada de acenorias (con acelgas)

Carnero verde con cus cus
(foto por cortesía de R. Hernández)
RH carnero verde

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