Tag Archives: digital collections

New Digital Content Now Available

Image from African American Serials Collection

Each year, the Ames librarians take advantage of end-of-year opportunities to acquire digital access to new content. With the new year upon us, we are happy to announce that the IWU community now has access to the digital archives of the following titles:

Esquire

Maclean’s

National Review

New Republic

Sports Illustrated

Time

In addition, we have acquired access to the African American Historical Serials Collection, which “documents the history of African American life and religious organizations from materials published between 1829 and 1922 and contains more than 170 unique titles related to African American life and culture.”

Image from African American Serials Collection

Providing access to these resources electronically promotes enhanced discoverability of these valuable resources, and facilitates student use of these resources in their own scholarly and creative work. The African American Historical Serials Collection also enhances the diversity of materials available to our students and faculty through the Ames Library, and promotes greater opportunities for discovery and analysis of information documenting diverse American cultures. Print volumes of journal titles now available digitally are being reviewed for retention as part of the current review and shifting of library materials.

You may find these resources, and more, through the Ames Library A-Z list of digital resources. If you have any questions about these new resources, please contact Stephanie Davis-Kahl, Collections and Scholarly Communications Librarian.

Celebrating CARLI!

If you’ve ever used I-Share (and if you haven’t, do it now) or searched our VuFind catalog for materials, you have CARLI to thank.

CARLI, which stands for Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois, is one of our most fantastic resources. Through CARLI, IWU faculty and students have access to incredible databases like EBSCO as well as many collections, digital and otherwise. CARLI also maintains a Last Copy program, meaning that they work to ensure access to monographs that exist in only a single copy across academic and research libraries in Illinois. Their diverse membership includes large libraries like the University of Illinois and small libraries like the Carl Sandburg Community College. Together, the libraries in this partnership advocate for you, the library user! As their new infographics demonstrate, CARLI served 800,000 students, faculty, and staff and delivered $43.1 million worth of materials and services to member libraries in the past fiscal year alone. It goes without saying that The Ames Library couldn’t be happier to be a member.

Top Five Hidden Resources at The Ames Library: #3. Archives & Special Collections

#3. Archives and Special Collections

Did you know that the library owns a book printed in Nuremberg, Germany in 1482? A program signed by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.? Photos of School of Theatre Arts productions dating from 1916 to the present day? And that you can use them any time you want?

It’s just one of the many cool offerings at the Tate Archives & Special Collections on our fourth floor, which is devoted to rare, valuable, and fragile materials, as well as records of IWU’s history. You can also explore the mysteries of IWU’s history and many of these artifacts of human knowledge online.

Free Digital Archive of Black Newspapers Goes Live

As of June 2018, the Obsidian Collection Archives is now available online. This digital collection of historic black newspaper archives was started when executive director Angela Ford realized that physical archives of papers like Chicago Defender were rapidly deteriorating and in need of preservation. ”To make matters worse, when she told her son about newsworthy things that had happened when she was growing up, he often found there was no record of those, either. ‘He’d go to Google it, and it wasn’t there,’ she says. ‘I thought, ‘Wait, what?… My past was disintegrating. That’s how I got involved: to save black history and to save myself.'” (Source)

Eight exhibitions are now live, with many more to be added.

Woman and girls on Maxwell Street, Shakir Karriem, Photographer 1983-08. From the collection of
The Obsidian Collection Archives.

From the Obsidian Collection’s mission statement:

Our primary goal is to preserve and share images from African American newspapers to future generations. As Black people moved about the country, the documentation of their lives was recorded on very few mediums. The African American Newspapers were of the few published tools of the first half of the twentieth century to capture any record of our lives, our goals, our suffering and our strength.

The list of partner newspapers can be accessed here, and you can read more about the project at Atlas Obscura and Smithsonian.com.