Author Archives: Meg Miner

Juneteenth book talk with Opal Lee

Opal Lee coverpage

The city of Boulder will sponsor a talk with Opal Lee–the Grand Mother of Juneteenth.
At 94 years young–Opal Lee leads a campaign with Carmelo Anthony, Sean Combs, and 
Pharrell to make Juneteenth a National Holiday.  

This virtual talk happens–Saturday (June 19th–!0:00).  
It will also be recorded and posted on youtube.
You can register for the program HERE.

Harpercollins will publish Opal Lee’s  poignant picture book biography soon.

Opal Lee coverpage

NYT artist–Keturah Bobo is the illustrator.  The pictures are stunning.  
The text is lyrical and engaging.  And it includes a a red Juneteenth punch recipe
from Texan and famous Diva Chef–Angela Medearis. 
Will you pre-order the book HERE?

RISE AND SHINE!
IT’S JUNETEENTH TIME!

LET THE JOY BEGIN!
JUNETEENTH IS FOR EVERYONE.
JUNETEENTH IS YOU AND ME!

Japanese Woodblock Print Exhibition

Bamboo Quay

Bamboo Quay

Bamboo Quay by Kyobashi Bridge (Kyobashi Takegashi)

A selection of Utagawa Hiroshige’s woodblock prints are on exhibit in The School of Art’s Wakeley Gallery now through February 11, 2021. Each print is a small world to lose yourself in during these trying times.

These and other woodblock prints are part of IWU’s Campus Art Collection.

From the exhibition guide:
In Hiroshige’s groundbreaking series of woodblock prints, The 53 Stations of the Tokaido (1832-1833), he captured the journey along the Tokaido road, the highway connecting Edo to Kyoto, the imperial capital.

Hiroshige’s prints continue to convey the beauty of Japan and provide insight into the everyday life of its citizens during the Edo period. The appeal of his tender, lyrical landscapes was not restricted to the Japanese audience. Hiroshige’s work had a profound influence on the Impressionists and Post-Impressionists of Europe: Toulouse-Lautrec was fascinated with Hiroshige’s daring diagonal compositions and inventive use of perspective, while Van Gogh literally copied two of Hiroshige’s prints from the famous series, 100 Famous Views of Edo in oil paint.
resource: https://www.roningallery.com/artists/Hiroshige

Lift Every Voice: Celebrating 250 Years of African American Poetry

LiftEveryVoice

LiftEveryVoiceThe University of Delaware Library, Museums and Press announces a new online exhibition:

Lift Every Voice: Celebrating 250 Years of African American Poetry

https://exhibitions.lib.udel.edu/lift-every-voice/

Lift Every Voice is a year-long, nationwide celebration of the 250-year tradition of African American poetry, its richness and diversity, and its central place in American poetry. The initiative is directed by Library of America in partnership with the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture and with libraries, arts organizations, and bookstores in all fifty states. It is supported by funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and Emerson Collective.

Curated by English and American literature librarian Aimee Gee and launched in December 2020, this exhibition highlights materials from the collections of the University of Delaware Library, Museums and Press and draws upon several past UD exhibitions. Lift Every Voice encourages visitors to reflect upon five intersecting themes that emerge from a close examination of the African American poetic tradition: The Freedom Struggle, Black Identities (Assertion & Protection), Black Experience in History & Memory, Black Language & Music, and Family & Community. Contact: AskSpec

IWU Campus Art Collection Now Online

Buscando Mi Color

Buscando Mi Color

“Buscando Mi Color” (2017) by Lucero Sanchez

The Ames Library is happy to announce the publication of the IWU Campus Art Collection, an initiative to locate, catalog, and photograph the variety of art on campus. The collection contains more than 1,000 pieces of artwork which have been created or donated by Friends of the University, alumni, faculty, and students.

The collection contains paintings, prints, sculptures, pottery, and more by famed artists including Salvadore Dali, Arrah Lee Gaul, Frederick Hart, Utagawa Hiroshige, Leroy Neiman, and Rembrandt van Rijn. Notable faculty artists are Miles Bair, Fred Brian, and Rupert Kilgore. Items in the collection date from the 12th century to the present day.

We invite you to peruse the collection, and emphasize that the collection is available for classroom use, individual students’ assignments, and research. To discuss specific needs, please contact the University Archivist, Meg Miner, at mminer@iwu.edu or phone at (309) 556-1538.

Author & Activist exhibit

Visit this exhibit at https://rosenbach.org/virtual-exhibits/

“ALICE DUNBAR-NELSON (1875–1935), poet, novelist, journalist, teacher, diarist, women’s suffrage organizer, civil rights leader, lecturer, political leader, and survivor of intimate partner violence, is a hero for our time. She combined her skills as an author and political activist to fight for social change.

“Born into the first generation of Black Americans after the end of slavery, Dunbar-Nelson represents a bridge between the Reconstruction Era following the Civil War and the civil rights movement of the mid-1900s. Her writings and social causes, which centered on race, gender, and power, feel as urgent today as they did during Dunbar-Nelson’s lifetime.”

As you explore the exhibition, we invite you to consider how Alice Dunbar-Nelson’s life and work can inspire residents of the United States today. How much has changed for women (especially women of color), LGBTQ+ people, Black Americans, and other people of color since Dunbar-Nelson pursued her activism in the early 20th century? How can we carry on the work she started? How can artifacts found in museums, libraries, and archives help us discover previously overlooked historical figures?

Thematic sections structure “I Am an American!,” meaning that the exhibition offers interpretive views into the life, times, and work of Alice Dunbar-Nelson.Thus, the documents and objects on view are not organized chronologically.

Free images to use and reuse and Happy OA Week!

Olveritas Village

Olvera Street in the oldest part of downtown Los Angeles, California

Here’s a seasonal and timely message from the Free to Use and Reuse collection at the Library of Congress.

The seasonal part of the message is they are profiling images of autumn, Día de Muertos and Halloween in this subset of their collection.

The timely part is that this is also Open Access Week, a global event for the academic and research community to continue to learn about the potential benefits of Open Access, to share what they’ve learned with colleagues, and to help inspire wider participation in helping to make Open Access a new norm in scholarship and research. This year’s emphasis is on examining who the knowledge-sharing and information spaces and systems are designed for, who is missing, who is excluded by the business models we use, and whose interests are prioritized.

OA 2020 banner logo

 

You can be a Citizen DJ!

citizen_dj_logo

citizen_dj_logo

The Library of Congress sponsors many kinds of residency programs. One of them involves different kinds of digital humanities projects.

Citizen DJ is a project by Brian Foo developed during his time as an Innovator in Residence at the Library of Congress. The application invites the public to make hip hop music using the Library’s public audio and moving image collections. By embedding these materials in hip hop music, listeners can discover items in the Library’s vast collections that they likely would never have known existed. For technical documentation and code, please see the report.

Archives for the Centennial of Women’s Right to Vote

Equality is the Sacred Law of Humanity

Equality is the Sacred Law of HumanityThis post is from a news release courtesy of the Society of American Archivists’s Committee on Public Awareness. Be sure to visit the poster exhibit on The Ames Library’s entry level, too!

Archives contain primary sources such as letters, photographs, and audio and video footage that document the work of early suffragists such as Carrie Chapman Catt, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Minnie Fisher Cunningham, Angelina Weld Grimke, and Ida B. Wells-Barnett. In making these materials available, archivists hope to remind the public of the long history of the battle for the right to vote and the suffragists’ roles in the fight for equality.

Here are a few archives and history organizations that are remembering the suffrage centennial via online exhibits, social media, and lesson plans. You are invited to join in the celebration!

  • The National Archives Museum in Washington, DC, created Rightfully Hers: American Women and the Vote, a 3,000-square-foot exhibit that draws from more than 90 documents, photographs, and artifacts in its collection – including the original Nineteenth Amendment, which will be on limited display. Check out the virtual exhibit led by archivist and curator Corinne Potter. The National Archives also has created a nationwide traveling exhibit, pop-up displays for classroom use, and educational resources and lesson plans for educators to incorporate into their curriculum.
  • The Women’s Suffrage Centennial Commission was established by Congress in April 2017 “to commemorate and coordinate the nationwide celebration of the 100th Anniversary of the 19th Amendment.” The non-partisan commission has created a federal legislative tracker to note all suffrage-related congressional legislation, as well as a chronological list of press releases on suffrage news, programs, and events.
  • The National Organization of Women is highlighting past and present “sheroes” via its Sisters in Suffrage website and social media campaign. Each day in the 100 days leading up to the anniversary of the vote, NOW has released a new image and biographical sketch that illustrate the extraordinary work of these remarkable and diverse women. The public is encouraged to participate and follow along via social media with the hashtags #sistersinsuffrage#Celebrating100#righttovote.
  • The Jimmy Carter Presidential Library and Museum is celebrating the centennial via a Google Arts and Culture exhibit about Rosalynn Carter’s fight for the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA); an article for The Text Message, the blog of the National Archives and Records Administration, about President Carter meeting an original suffragist prior to the Alice Paul Memorial March of 1977; and a new interview of Rosalynn Carter by her former daughter-in-law, Judy Langford Carter, about the fight for ERA.
  • The Radcliffe Institute’s Schlesinger Library at Harvard University has invited researchers, writers, and teachers to create a series of digital teaching modules for its Suffrage School. Each lesson connects to the library’s Long 19th Amendment Project, tackling the tangled history of gender and American citizenship, and includes a short video in which the instructor shares a primary source from the Schlesinger’s collections. Lessons include a link to the digitized documents, questions to guide further reflection, and additional readings.
  • The National Women’s History Museum provides a wide variety of lesson plans, modules, downloadable documents, PowerPoints, and videos for educators wanting to integrate the history of Women’s Suffrage into their educational curriculums. Each specific lesson plan is tailored to meet the requirements of students from grades 6 to 12. Additionally, a timeline of the suffrage movement and corresponding educational activities test students’ knowledge of the timeline.
  • The National Park Service, through its 20 Suffragists to Know for 2020 profiles, spotlights the biographies of diverse women of color, such as  Marie Louise Bottineau BaldwinMabel Ping-Hua LeeNina Otero-Warren, and Zitkala-Ša, whose work  contributed to the passage of the 19th Amendment even as they waged their own battles against racism and discrimination.

Newspaper archive database to explore

newspaperarchive promo

newspaperarchive promo

Extra! Extra!

The Ames Library has acquired temporary access to a collection of historical newspapers from the NewspaperArchive.com.

Dating from 1607-2020, the database contains more than 15,495+ different titles from every US state and twenty-eight other countries around the world. Every newspaper in the archive is fully searchable by keyword, date, place, and title making it easy for you to quickly see if we have the article you’re seeking.

Test it out and let us know what you think!

 

Information on the Coronavirus

Covid-19_stop-spread

Today, Dean of Students Karla Carney-Hall and Interim Executive Director of Health/Counseling Vickie Folse distributed the message copied below about staying safe and healthy during Spring Break. You may also consult this resource guide on the Coronavirus for sources about this disease.

Click on the image below to get a halfsheet-sized poster you can put in your room or office for others to see!Covid-19_stop-spread

[copied message]

Students, faculty, and staff,
As we look forward to Spring Break which typically brings some travel, we want to remind you to stay healthy and take preventative precautions. Between flu season and ongoing concerns about the Coronavirus, we want to be mindful and vigilant about public health. We have many confirmed instances of flu on campus, but no cases of Coronavirus at IWU or in the Bloomington/Normal community. Our study abroad partners are monitoring the spread of Coronavirus in Italy and other areas of the world. If you are abroad now or scheduled to study abroad in May, summer or other international travel, you will receive a separate update from the International Office.

While we believe our campus risk remains low, we will continue to monitor this global health crisis. Please note the following preventative strategies:

  • Wash your hands often with soap and hot water for at least 20 seconds.
  • Use antibacterial hand solution when available.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick. If you are sick, stay home and avoid public contact.
  • Cover your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze.
  • Clean and disinfect surfaces.
  • If you are traveling out of the US, research health advisories for your travel area. Review the ‘CDC Travelers’ Health website: (https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel) to learn how to stay healthy during your trip.
  • Monitor the CDC website for updated information.

We want to be mindful of our students from highly impacted areas around the world – our support and care go out to you as your home communities respond to the virus. We encourage all members of our campus community to be inclusive and respectful in supporting each other through this difficult global crisis.

The health and safety of our community is our top priority and we will continue to monitor updates from state, federal and international health organizations. Please contact Arnold Health Services with any questions or concerns.

Sincerely,
Karla C. Carney-Hall, Dean of Students
Vickie Folse, Interim Executive Director of Health/Counseling