Author Archives: Meg Miner

Discover Collections on Black Experiences

Black Metropolis Research Consortium (BMRC) logo

The Black Metropolis Research Consortium (BMRC) Archives Portal offers access by searching or browsing content that is freely available to you in libraries, museums, archives, and other organizations in the Chicago area.

Since its founding in 2006, the BMRC has completed two major archival management projects making previously “hidden” collections available for researchers, scholars, and artists. The Consortium believes that web-based research tools provide an excellent opportunity for broadening access to unique primary source materials held in its members’ collections.

In celebration of its 15th anniversary in 2021, the BMRC created this online exhibit that documents the origins of the BMRC, its efforts to aid discoverability and access to Black historical collections, and the consortium’s flagship Summer Short-term Fellowship and Archie Motley Archival Internship programs.

Freedom in the Black Diaspora: A Resource Guide for Ayiti Reimagined

This guide is a comprehensive starting point for finding curated resources in the Library of Congress on the Haitian Revolution (1791-1804), Haitian Creole (Kreyòl Ayisyen), the United States occupation of Haiti, and Black internationalism, as well as links to external websites that center important narratives in Haitian history. (“Ayiti” is the Creole spelling of Haiti.) Sections of the guide include Haitian History: Primary Resources; Liberté, Égalité, Fraternité: Secondary Sources; Celebrating Black Joy: Haitian & Haitian American Stories; Haitian Creole; and External Websites.

Patrons using The Ames Library will also find almost 2000 resources listed in the online catalog and thousands more in article databases and digital collections. For help exploring this topic and others, you can schedule an appointment with a librarian or stop by during office hours. 

A black man with handlebar mustache and goatee Faces te camer but is seated in three-quarter profile, left leg crossed over right. He is wearing a three-piece suit, bowtie and holds a pair of gloves in his left hand, resting on his leg. The caption in the source reads "Cincinnatus Leconte, President of Haiti. 1911-1912. Haitian Collection,1775-1950. Library of Congress Manuscript Division."
Cincinnatus Leconte, President of Haiti. 1911-1912. Haitian Collection,1775-1950. Library of Congress Manuscript Division.

Get enlightened in the library this winter!

Counseling & Consultation Services placed two Sunbox lamps in the library to assist with seasonal affective disorder (SAD). Both are in the East wing of the building in a room that’s a little hidden: it’s behind the book stacks in the center of the wing’s outer edge. There’s one on the 3rd floor and one on the 4th floor.

Just 20–30 minutes with the Sunbox can boost energy and improve your mood! They are available at any time the library is open on a first come, first served basis–no reservations are needed. Detailed information regarding the use of the Sunbox is posted by each lamp.

sun-box

Juneteenth book talk with Opal Lee

Opal Lee coverpage

The city of Boulder will sponsor a talk with Opal Lee–the Grand Mother of Juneteenth.
At 94 years young–Opal Lee leads a campaign with Carmelo Anthony, Sean Combs, and 
Pharrell to make Juneteenth a National Holiday.  

This virtual talk happens–Saturday (June 19th–!0:00).  
It will also be recorded and posted on youtube.
You can register for the program HERE.

Harpercollins will publish Opal Lee’s  poignant picture book biography soon.

Opal Lee coverpage

NYT artist–Keturah Bobo is the illustrator.  The pictures are stunning.  
The text is lyrical and engaging.  And it includes a a red Juneteenth punch recipe
from Texan and famous Diva Chef–Angela Medearis. 
Will you pre-order the book HERE?

RISE AND SHINE!
IT’S JUNETEENTH TIME!

LET THE JOY BEGIN!
JUNETEENTH IS FOR EVERYONE.
JUNETEENTH IS YOU AND ME!

Japanese Woodblock Print Exhibition

Bamboo Quay

Bamboo Quay

Bamboo Quay by Kyobashi Bridge (Kyobashi Takegashi)

A selection of Utagawa Hiroshige’s woodblock prints are on exhibit in The School of Art’s Wakeley Gallery now through February 11, 2021. Each print is a small world to lose yourself in during these trying times.

These and other woodblock prints are part of IWU’s Campus Art Collection.

From the exhibition guide:
In Hiroshige’s groundbreaking series of woodblock prints, The 53 Stations of the Tokaido (1832-1833), he captured the journey along the Tokaido road, the highway connecting Edo to Kyoto, the imperial capital.

Hiroshige’s prints continue to convey the beauty of Japan and provide insight into the everyday life of its citizens during the Edo period. The appeal of his tender, lyrical landscapes was not restricted to the Japanese audience. Hiroshige’s work had a profound influence on the Impressionists and Post-Impressionists of Europe: Toulouse-Lautrec was fascinated with Hiroshige’s daring diagonal compositions and inventive use of perspective, while Van Gogh literally copied two of Hiroshige’s prints from the famous series, 100 Famous Views of Edo in oil paint.
resource: https://www.roningallery.com/artists/Hiroshige

Lift Every Voice: Celebrating 250 Years of African American Poetry

LiftEveryVoice

LiftEveryVoiceThe University of Delaware Library, Museums and Press announces a new online exhibition:

Lift Every Voice: Celebrating 250 Years of African American Poetry

https://exhibitions.lib.udel.edu/lift-every-voice/

Lift Every Voice is a year-long, nationwide celebration of the 250-year tradition of African American poetry, its richness and diversity, and its central place in American poetry. The initiative is directed by Library of America in partnership with the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture and with libraries, arts organizations, and bookstores in all fifty states. It is supported by funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and Emerson Collective.

Curated by English and American literature librarian Aimee Gee and launched in December 2020, this exhibition highlights materials from the collections of the University of Delaware Library, Museums and Press and draws upon several past UD exhibitions. Lift Every Voice encourages visitors to reflect upon five intersecting themes that emerge from a close examination of the African American poetic tradition: The Freedom Struggle, Black Identities (Assertion & Protection), Black Experience in History & Memory, Black Language & Music, and Family & Community. Contact: AskSpec

IWU Campus Art Collection Now Online

Buscando Mi Color

Buscando Mi Color

“Buscando Mi Color” (2017) by Lucero Sanchez

The Ames Library is happy to announce the publication of the IWU Campus Art Collection, an initiative to locate, catalog, and photograph the variety of art on campus. The collection contains more than 1,000 pieces of artwork which have been created or donated by Friends of the University, alumni, faculty, and students.

The collection contains paintings, prints, sculptures, pottery, and more by famed artists including Salvadore Dali, Arrah Lee Gaul, Frederick Hart, Utagawa Hiroshige, Leroy Neiman, and Rembrandt van Rijn. Notable faculty artists are Miles Bair, Fred Brian, and Rupert Kilgore. Items in the collection date from the 12th century to the present day.

We invite you to peruse the collection, and emphasize that the collection is available for classroom use, individual students’ assignments, and research. To discuss specific needs, please contact the University Archivist, Meg Miner, at mminer@iwu.edu or phone at (309) 556-1538.

Author & Activist exhibit

Visit this exhibit at https://rosenbach.org/virtual-exhibits/

“ALICE DUNBAR-NELSON (1875–1935), poet, novelist, journalist, teacher, diarist, women’s suffrage organizer, civil rights leader, lecturer, political leader, and survivor of intimate partner violence, is a hero for our time. She combined her skills as an author and political activist to fight for social change.

“Born into the first generation of Black Americans after the end of slavery, Dunbar-Nelson represents a bridge between the Reconstruction Era following the Civil War and the civil rights movement of the mid-1900s. Her writings and social causes, which centered on race, gender, and power, feel as urgent today as they did during Dunbar-Nelson’s lifetime.”

As you explore the exhibition, we invite you to consider how Alice Dunbar-Nelson’s life and work can inspire residents of the United States today. How much has changed for women (especially women of color), LGBTQ+ people, Black Americans, and other people of color since Dunbar-Nelson pursued her activism in the early 20th century? How can we carry on the work she started? How can artifacts found in museums, libraries, and archives help us discover previously overlooked historical figures?

Thematic sections structure “I Am an American!,” meaning that the exhibition offers interpretive views into the life, times, and work of Alice Dunbar-Nelson.Thus, the documents and objects on view are not organized chronologically.

Free images to use and reuse and Happy OA Week!

Olveritas Village

Olvera Street in the oldest part of downtown Los Angeles, California

Here’s a seasonal and timely message from the Free to Use and Reuse collection at the Library of Congress.

The seasonal part of the message is they are profiling images of autumn, Día de Muertos and Halloween in this subset of their collection.

The timely part is that this is also Open Access Week, a global event for the academic and research community to continue to learn about the potential benefits of Open Access, to share what they’ve learned with colleagues, and to help inspire wider participation in helping to make Open Access a new norm in scholarship and research. This year’s emphasis is on examining who the knowledge-sharing and information spaces and systems are designed for, who is missing, who is excluded by the business models we use, and whose interests are prioritized.

OA 2020 banner logo

 

You can be a Citizen DJ!

citizen_dj_logo

citizen_dj_logo

The Library of Congress sponsors many kinds of residency programs. One of them involves different kinds of digital humanities projects.

Citizen DJ is a project by Brian Foo developed during his time as an Innovator in Residence at the Library of Congress. The application invites the public to make hip hop music using the Library’s public audio and moving image collections. By embedding these materials in hip hop music, listeners can discover items in the Library’s vast collections that they likely would never have known existed. For technical documentation and code, please see the report.