Ames Awards Announcement

 

Serenade by Jazalyn Belz

“Serenade” by Jazalyn Belz

Congratulations to Jazalyn Belz, ’24, the 2021 recipient of The Ames Library Art Purchase Award! Jazalyn’s print, titled “Serenade,” will be displayed in the library soon. The Art Purchase Award is a long-standing tradition at the library, and you can view more student art in our digital collection.

Congratulations to Katie Fata, ’22, the 2021 recipient of The Ames Library Scholarly and Artistic Research Proposal Award! Katie’s research project, “__Plath: Confronting the Tone Policing of Sylvia Plath,” will take her to explore the archives at Indiana University, and she will be sharing her progress via a blog this summer. Her final project will reside in Digital Commons @ IWU when complete.

 

 

The Ames Library is Open!

 

The library is now open!

Thanks to Physical Plant staff for keeping our building safe and beautiful!

The Ames Library Announces Open Educational Resources (OER) Exploratory Grants

The Ames Library OER Exploration Grants

The Ames Library will fund five, two-hundred dollar grants for faculty to explore Open Educational resources (OER) for their class(es). OER are defined as learning resources, teaching practices, and  education policies that use the flexibility of OER to provide learners with high quality educational experiences. OER are either in the public domain or licensed in a manner that provides everyone with free and perpetual permission to engage in the 5R activities – retaining, remixing, revising, reusing and redistributing the resources. There is increasing OER interest for higher education because they help to reduce educational inequality by removing (or reducing) student costs to access course materials. Large scale studies of OER show lower course drop rates, improved student grades, and better retention. For this grant, materials that are not strictly OER, but are “free” to students, such as library-owned articles, videos, digital archives, and open access materials are also acceptable.

OER can include any of the following:

  • Open textbooks
  • Public domain materials
  • Videos
  • Tutorials / modules / simulations
  • Quizzes / ancillary materials

Our goal with the OER grant is for faculty to explore OER resources, selecting and critically assessing specific materials for inclusion in their courses, and ultimately, to encourage faculty to adopt OERs. We also hope faculty will be able to use the results of these exploration grants to later propose CD grants focused on revising courses or assignments to incorporate OERs.

Requirements

Faculty will be asked to select and review several OERs and/or materials that are free to students that have the potential for integration into a current or future course. OER repositories and search engines can be found on the Ames Library OER LibGuide and the CARLI Open Illinois Initiative site. Your liaison librarian is happy to assist as well. 

At the conclusion of the project, grant recipients agree to participate in a campus panel discussion about materials you discovered and how you plan to incorporate them into an assignment/course. In addition, the faculty member will submit a 2-3 page (single spaced) written report which will include the following:

  • Summary and evaluation of specific OER or free-to-students resources that you discovered 
  • How these materials support your pedagogical goals
  • The class or classes these materials could be incorporated into
  • Reflection on the evolving role of OER in higher education and/or your discipline

Grants are awarded on a first-come, first-served, basis and the grant disbursements will occur after the receipt of your written report. Reports are due within five months from initial approval.

If you would like to secure one of these grants, or have any questions, please contact Chris Sweet in the Ames Library (csweet@iwu.edu, x3984).

Black History Month Resources

To celebrate Black History Month, we’ll be sharing resources from our collection as well as sites from around the internet:

screenshot of The Star of ZionOur subscription to the African American Historical Serials Collection provides access to “an archive of periodicals that document the history of African American religious life and culture between 1829 and 1922. It includes newspapers and magazines, plus reports and annuals from African American religious organizations, including churches and social service agencies. Now compiled and accessible to researchers in one digital collection, this unique resource documents the history of African American life and religious organizations from 1829 and 1922. Content features multiple religious denominations, including the African Methodist Episcopal Church, the African Methodist Zion Church and many Baptist churches.”

University Council on Diversity Alumni interviewsIn 2010, the University Council on Diversity invited alumni to participate in interviews addressing diversity. This collection, stewarded by Meg Miner, our University Archivist and Special Collections Librarian, will be added to as more interviews are done with alumni in the future.

 

 

 

 

UGA NewsThe University of Georgia’s Brown Media Archives recently discovered footage from the area’s African American community in a home movie. Read the press release, or visit the Brown Media Archives page for more information.

 

 

 

 

 

JSTOR Companion to Schomburg's reading list JSTOR, one of our favorite organizations, recently created a companion to the renowned Schomburg Center’s for Research in Black Culture‘s Black Liberation Reading List. For more information about the reading list, see the JSTOR Daily, which also links to Black Liberation Lists for teens and children.

 

 

 

 

 

Historymakers From the Library of Congress, The HistoryMakers collects oral histories from notables in the African American community, across the United States. Artists, sports figures, lawmakers, and scientists are just a few of the groups represented.

 

Call for Scholarly and Artistic Research Award Proposals!

The Ames Library Scholarly and Artistic Research Proposal Award provides one $500 award for an IWU student, under the supervision of a faculty sponsor, to propose a significant research or creative project in their specific fields of study. More details and application instructions are available online, and the deadline is March 8.

We can’t wait to read about your ideas for your research!

Japanese Woodblock Print Exhibition

Bamboo Quay
Bamboo Quay

Bamboo Quay by Kyobashi Bridge (Kyobashi Takegashi)

A selection of Utagawa Hiroshige’s woodblock prints are on exhibit in The School of Art’s Wakeley Gallery now through February 11, 2021. Each print is a small world to lose yourself in during these trying times.

These and other woodblock prints are part of IWU’s Campus Art Collection.

From the exhibition guide:
In Hiroshige’s groundbreaking series of woodblock prints, The 53 Stations of the Tokaido (1832-1833), he captured the journey along the Tokaido road, the highway connecting Edo to Kyoto, the imperial capital.

Hiroshige’s prints continue to convey the beauty of Japan and provide insight into the everyday life of its citizens during the Edo period. The appeal of his tender, lyrical landscapes was not restricted to the Japanese audience. Hiroshige’s work had a profound influence on the Impressionists and Post-Impressionists of Europe: Toulouse-Lautrec was fascinated with Hiroshige’s daring diagonal compositions and inventive use of perspective, while Van Gogh literally copied two of Hiroshige’s prints from the famous series, 100 Famous Views of Edo in oil paint.
resource: https://www.roningallery.com/artists/Hiroshige

Lift Every Voice: Celebrating 250 Years of African American Poetry

LiftEveryVoice

LiftEveryVoiceThe University of Delaware Library, Museums and Press announces a new online exhibition:

Lift Every Voice: Celebrating 250 Years of African American Poetry

https://exhibitions.lib.udel.edu/lift-every-voice/

Lift Every Voice is a year-long, nationwide celebration of the 250-year tradition of African American poetry, its richness and diversity, and its central place in American poetry. The initiative is directed by Library of America in partnership with the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture and with libraries, arts organizations, and bookstores in all fifty states. It is supported by funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and Emerson Collective.

Curated by English and American literature librarian Aimee Gee and launched in December 2020, this exhibition highlights materials from the collections of the University of Delaware Library, Museums and Press and draws upon several past UD exhibitions. Lift Every Voice encourages visitors to reflect upon five intersecting themes that emerge from a close examination of the African American poetic tradition: The Freedom Struggle, Black Identities (Assertion & Protection), Black Experience in History & Memory, Black Language & Music, and Family & Community. Contact: AskSpec

IWU Campus Art Collection Now Online

Buscando Mi Color
Buscando Mi Color

“Buscando Mi Color” (2017) by Lucero Sanchez

The Ames Library is happy to announce the publication of the IWU Campus Art Collection, an initiative to locate, catalog, and photograph the variety of art on campus. The collection contains more than 1,000 pieces of artwork which have been created or donated by Friends of the University, alumni, faculty, and students.

The collection contains paintings, prints, sculptures, pottery, and more by famed artists including Salvadore Dali, Arrah Lee Gaul, Frederick Hart, Utagawa Hiroshige, Leroy Neiman, and Rembrandt van Rijn. Notable faculty artists are Miles Bair, Fred Brian, and Rupert Kilgore. Items in the collection date from the 12th century to the present day.

We invite you to peruse the collection, and emphasize that the collection is available for classroom use, individual students’ assignments, and research. To discuss specific needs, please contact the University Archivist, Meg Miner, at mminer@iwu.edu or phone at (309) 556-1538.

Holiday Break & Beyond

 

 

 

 

The Ames Library will be closed from Saturday, November 21 – Sunday, November 29 for the holiday break.

From Monday, November 30 2020 – Sunday, January 3 2021, the building will be closed. Please see our updated FAQ for more information about requesting library materials, access to the Thorpe Center, and contacting your liaison librarian. All staff will be on break between December 24 2020 – January 3 2021.

Wishing you all a safe and happy holiday season, and looking forward to the new year!

Native American Heritage Month

Banner for Native American Heritage Month To learn more about Native American Heritage Month…

Visit our book exhibit on the entry level of The Ames Library, curated by Meg Miner, University Archivist and Special Collections Librarian, and learn more about the John Wesley Powell Collection of Pueblo Pottery.

Visit https://nativeamericanheritagemonth.gov for exhibits, audio, and video.

Participate in the Native Cinema Showcase, Wednesday, November 18, 2020, 7 – 11 PM (available on demand until November 23)

Watch these and other PBS documentaries online:
Standing Bear’s Footsteps: The story of an Indian chief who redefined what it means to be an American
Urban Rez: How do Native Americans maintain their culture in a dominant society?
Kind Hearted Woman Part One: An unforgettable portrait of a single mother living on North Dakota’s Spirit Lake Reservation

Learn more about Indigenous Land Acknowledgements, and learn what native land you live on.

Finally, check out IWU Writing Center’s Twitter for reading suggestions!