Job Searching: How to make it count.

image: http://www.forbes.com/sites/susanadams/2013/01/16/secrets-of-making-the-most-of-job-search-websites-2/
image: http://www.forbes.com/sites/susanadams/2013/01/16/secrets-of-making-the-most-of-job-search-websites-2/

“The most important secret to making online job search sites work for you: Use them sparingly,” says Susan Adams, Forbes Staff writer. By sparingly, she means only ten percent of your searching should be spent on these sites. That’s your golden rule! According to experts from job search sites and career coaches, such sites cannot be counted on as the ultimate way to land a job. Focus on the networking and direct contacting of the people in charge of the job(s) you desire. The full article can be accessed with the click of your mouse, but…

Here are also some quick and helpful tips (from the job site experts and career coaches) on how to use the plethora of online job sites:

Start with aggregators
– Indeed.com and SimplyHired.com gather listings from all over the web.

Use filter options
– For instance, Indeed has a salary range you can select from and SimplyHired has adjectives you can select to describe the workplace that would suit you.

* Use SimplyHired’s “who do I know” tool
– It will let you display Facebook or LinkedIn contacts with connections to each job listing upon your search.

* Set Up Alerts
– This can be troublesome if you don’t clean our your e-mail on a daily basis! However, signing up for e-mail that notify you of job listings as soon as they are posted can be a beneficial way to getting a head start of the competition.

* Go to niche job sites tailored to your major
– Examples are Dice.com (Technology) and Idealist.org (Non-Profit).

* Pay special attention to listings for key words and phrases in the job post
– These words and phrases can give you help for the content in your cover letter.

Remember to not confuse time allocation between job search sites and actual direct contacting or networking. “Spend 80% networking and directly contacting people in charge of the jobs,” says Adams.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *